July 14, 2012

Postmodernism and Critical Theory Resource

In response to my piece, "From radical to liberal Islam – Is intrinsic change possible?" which has been reproduced on this site and, my L Party Blog, I have received notice of a valuable link that serves as a useful resource for those wishing to engage in further exploration of both Postmodernism and Critical Theory. For those that recall it, I attempted to critically analyse whether "change" was possible amongst immigrants in western societies e.g. Britain, Australia and the U.S. Specifically, those who may "harbour radical elements of their faith", and questioning whether too, they would be likely to abandon "such beliefs as they commune within their new society, moving away from considerations of the extreme or moderately fanatical elements of Islamic thought - moving therefore, from radical to forms of liberal Islam?"

I suggest that in the first instance one reads my piece again to understand the how concepts of self in terms of both modernism and postmodernism, work there way into the arguement before exporing the resource.

I have taken the liberty of reproducing the first paragraph from the resource which you will find below, and invite readers to visit the actual resource page, Contemporary Philosophy – Postmodernism and Critical Theory for further reading.

Broadly and variously defined, postmodernism refers to a specific period of time that began in the 1940s, a style of literature, architecture, art philosophy, or the plight of Western society in post-capitalist age. This movement encompasses a set of critical and rhetorical practices employing concepts such as difference, repetition, and hyperreality to break apart or deconstruct other the structural elements achieved through modernism, including temporality, presence, identity, historical progress, epistemic certainty, and meaning achieved through unity. The term “postmodernism” first entered the philosophical lexicon in 1979, with the publication of The Postmodern Condition, by Jean-François Lyotard, in which Lyotard utilizes Ludwig Wittgenstein’s model of language games and concepts taken from speech act theory to account for “a transformation of the game rules” for science, art, and literature. For Lyotard, postmodern thought can best be summed up as “incredulity towards meta narratives.” According to Lyotard, postmodernists eschew “grand narratives” that attempt to account for, explain, and compartmentalize human life and history; there is no clearly defined, collective meaning and for the postmodern world, there is no mourning of the loss of meaning because the outcome of one’s own experience and condition will necessarily be fallible and relative, rather than exact and universal.
More here

1 comments:

Donald Douglas said...

Ottavio: Keep posting!